Taking The Next Step Into Management: Industries And Tips To Thrive

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Sometimes it can be hard to think about developing your career and you can be guilty of getting stuck in a rut. You can be become comfortable with your chosen job, perhaps happy and content with the wages that you earn or even the lifestyle you can afford, but these shouldn’t be the reasons why you wouldn’t want to progress. There is so much more that you could have and management could help you afford that lifestyle like extra holidays or luxuries in life. So I thought I would share with you some of the industries where you can step into management roles and how best to make that happen.

The engineering industry

Maybe you are currently working in the engineering industry. Perhaps out on construction sites, in factories or on the shop floor. There tends to be a direct route when it comes to the career path and management can often be the ideal next step to take. It does, however, mean that you need to think about things like taking a masters in engineering management online to help you learn the necessary skills to progress in this way. It could certainly give you the edge against other potential candidates and it could help you secure the job easier.

The sales environment

Working in sales can give you a real buzz, and so it’s understandable that if you have begun to thrive in your sales environment that you may be looking for the next step. A chance to further increase your earning potential while progressing with your career and management can be a great way to do that. However, to progress into management you do need to have a consistent track record in sales. You need to be able to perform so that you have the respect to lead others in the same way.

The office environment

Perhaps you are currently working in an office. Maybe you work in administration or accounts, and you are looking for the next step. Ideally there will be some form of office manager in place. This could be your next move. Shadowing this manager and taking on any extra courses to learn new skills could help. This alongside taking on additional responsibility could show that you are ready for the next move.

Working for yourself

Finally, could working for yourself be the answer? So many people have the dream of being their own boss and yet many of them don’t have the tenacity to make it happen. You could make it happen. It might be that you already have a hobby that could be turned into a business. You may have had an idea that just won’t go away. Or you might just have skills that could be easily freelanced to help you kick start your own business. Whatever it it, it could be the key to your own success and becoming the manager of your own destiny when it comes to your career.

I hope that this has motivated you to consider the next step you could take with your career.

The Secret To Unleashing Your Productivity

Distractions

There are plenty of myths surrounding productivity, but most of them are false because they’re centered on being more focused or giving perks. Managers would love to find the magical whip they can use to micromanage workers, but that stuff doesn’t work in the post-industrial days. Productivity is getting in a “flow” similar to when an athlete gets in the “zone.” It’s not as simple as snapping your fingers and you’re there. Instead it’s about controlling your surroundings and tuning out the noise that distracts us in a technologically driven world.

Rationally thinking becoming hyper-focused is the key, but it’s not. It’s like when you’re having a hard time falling asleep, the more you try the worse it gets. Actually when you “turn off your brain” is when you naturally dose off. I found as working as a Millennial Coach, the key lies with removing distractions. This can be as simple as venting to someone else. Imagine entering a room frustrated, then leaving refreshed. Work isn’t even discussed, but you feel ready to conquer the world walking out. Companies such as Zappos and Google are forward-thinking enough to provide the optimal environments to enhance productivity. Back to the analogy of the micromanaging boss, in order to unleash your optimal performance trust must be given freely. It is not without consequences, but a person should be innocent until proven guilty, not the other way around. Leaders empower productivity, they don’t control it.

The next time you’re watching a sporting event, watch how athletes prepare before the game. Most have headphones on and are listening to their favorite music. Why? Besides possibly being sponsored to wear a certain brand, it’s a pre-ritual to help calm their mind and body. The term corporate wellness gets thrown around a lot these days, but essentially its function is to counter the daily stress with an outlet of release or relaxation. Most people wake up, grab coffee and stumble into work wondering why they’re not in the mood to produce at a high level. You may not be able to listen to music by yourself during work, but you can go for a morning workout, eat a healthy breakfast or listen to music that calms or motivates you in the car during your commute.

Lastly, I can’t emphasize how crucial to your success coping is. That means being able to deal with curveballs thrown at you frequently. You can’t control what happens to you, but you can control how you respond to it. Re-framing situations from negative to positive is merely turning that frown upside down. Your mind has the ability to pause in situations that don’t feel right and choose to focus on something else. For example, if you’re given a new assignment that has a hard deadline soon instead of complaining about it, stop, re-prioritize and drop what you’re currently doing to work on what’s more urgent. A split second is all it takes to catch yourself from going down a hole of despair to re-framing to what’s more positive.

So the next time you’re having a problem getting focused, think about your environment. Experiment with what’s conducive to your optimal performance and tinker with it constantly like a game. There are some factors, like meetings or an annoying co-worker, that you can’t control, but you’d be surprised to know a lot of your performance has to do with what you decide to tune out.