Limit Your Leap Of Faith: Developing A Career Change When You’re Already In One

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In life, we are all looking for the next challenge. If you feel that your current job is not providing that fulfilment it once was, it’s now time to think about transitioning from one career to another. However, it’s not that easy, it’s something that takes time, effort, and the necessary qualifications. Time is the biggest factor, especially when you are working a full-time job. And while it’s foolish to give up your current job to take this leap of faith into a new career, especially when you don’t know what it’s going to be like, what can you do to develop a career change while you are already in one?

Understand The Commitments Of The New Career

Of course, a new beginning looks great on paper, but when you sign up for the relevant courses, it is at this point you might realize what you got yourself into. Nowadays, it’s easier than ever to gain a relevant qualification, because of online degrees, so if you were to complete an online BSW (Bachelor of Social Work) or an MBA (Masters in Business Administration), it’s vital for you to know how much of a commitment these courses are. Luckily, a lot of distance learning can be done part-time. This gives you a lot of breathing space as far as your current job is concerned.

Maintain A Work-Life Balance

And while courses can be done part-time, it’s still important for you to ensure you have a healthy work-life balance. You could be working from 9 to 5, and then coming home and doing coursework, and if you are someone with a family, you can feel the pressures. And while it’s easier said than done, it’s important for you to maintain a work-life balance by structuring everything to the finest point. Look at your duties in life, and plan a structure so you can complete your course, do your job, but also, still enjoy life.

Don’t Let Your Dream Career Interfere With Your Current One

While it’s exciting to jump ship from your current job, as you prepare your career transition, you don’t want to ignore your current responsibilities. Lots of people stop caring when they know they are about to leave. But you still need a good reference, especially if you’ve been with the company for a long time. It’s these people who will recommend to your future employer what you’re like to work with, and they know very well how you work because you’ve been with them for so long. And while it’s easy to mentally “check out”, don’t burn your bridges.

It’s an exciting transition in life, and when you’ve decided on your new career, taking the positive steps can feel like you are reclaiming your life. But developing a new career is something that is almost like developing a side hustle; you have to do a little bit, as much as you can, until your part-time endeavors get to the point where you can’t balance both anymore. And while it can be a challenge to maintain both, in this modern world it’s necessary for you to be practical while pursuing your dream job.

Taking Your Graphic Design Career To The Next Level

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There’s no doubt that you have to love what you do to become a graphic designer. Aside from the technology and digital knowledge, you’ll need to succeed; you must have an understanding of all things visual, and how things appear to an audience or the mass market. You’ll have a skill of providing information clearly, and ensuring that a brand or company’s values are represented through type and forms across the board. It may have started in your sketchbook at school when you were constantly drawing lettering, cartoons, or characters. And, thankfully; you’re now living in an age where you can take those initial sketchbook ideas and create something visually pleasing on a large scale, across a plethora of platforms.

Graphic design surrounds everyone, even those who don’t realize what it is; it will be impacting their thoughts, feelings, and choices in everyday life. Therefore, a graphic designer needs to keep their creativity alive, while designing something that will influence the masses, and also ensure that their clients like what they do, which is no easy feat. These tasks and duties reiterate that you need constant passion and drive if you’re heading into design, and ready to develop and evolve, as technology and demand do. The following are some ideas and inspiration for designers who want to take their career to the next level but feel a little unsure of where to turn next.

New Ways To Communicate

If you’ve been working on 2D graphics for the web or for print; you might be looking to expand your horizons and see where your design skills can take you next. A great form communication through design and one that’s growing in popularity in a digital age is motion graphics and animation. Therefore, it’s worth doing your research, learning Adobe After Effects, and getting to grips with bringing your graphics to life. You’ll need to develop your understanding of how music and motion can create impact, and look into designers who are paving the way for young creatives. Those who understand and utilize motion graphics can often head into directing, and becoming the lead creative in a number of different fields. So, it’s well worth making that typeface do something more exciting than just sitting on the screen.

Have A Side Hustle

Every creative needs an outlet where they’re able to experiment. However, it can be challenging when you’ve got a traditional 9-5 job, and your clients want you to work within set boundaries. You’ll never develop or evolve if you’re not using your free time to create things that excite you. Use your lunch hour to hop on Behance, or set yourself an imaginary project to complete in your evenings and at the weekend. Polish a personal online portfolio so that others can see what you’re capable of; who knows who might get in touch for a collaboration or potential side project. Never stop learning or seeing what others are doing; graphic design is a career that continues to evolve at lightning speed, so it’s vital that you try your best to keep up.

How to Diversify Your Career (Like Your Portfolio)

Financial advisors will tell you never put all your eggs into one basket.

Brilliant advice, but why does it need to stop there?

Having one source of income is risky.

If you’re working corporate and get laid off/fired you’re in trouble.

If you’re an entrepreneur/freelancer and lack predicable paychecks you’re screwed.

You and I have been told to choose something for your career then focus all your time and energy there, but what if that isn’t great advice?

What if I told you can have both? (have your cake and eat it too!)

There are pros and cons to choosing working for someone else vs. working for yourself, but if you manage your time right and stay organized there’s no reason you can’t sustain two or more options.

You may be hesitant to monetize your passion, which is fine, but is there another side project you can earn money from?

If working a salaried position within a company, “full-time” needs to be defined up front (ask in the interview process). The scary part is once you’re on salary you’re not being paid for the hours worked, but essentially based on the needs of the company (translation: overtime is not optional or compensated for).

Remember full-time is technically 30 hours and if you’re dealing with a startup you can negotiate this ahead of time. In fact it’s refreshing that most people working in startups actually encourage you to have side hustles.

Google made “side projects” cool by promoting 20% time. Employees get 20% of their work time to spend collaborating with others trying to create new products/services. Now everyone doesn’t work for Google or a company of that stature, but we all have the same amount of time in week to use accordingly.

For instance if you’re working a 9-6 job plus have a family, set aside a few hours a week after putting the kids down to draft out and test your ideas. If you’re single or dating, you really have no excuses.

Maybe you’re waiting for permission or inspiration, but like most things in life consistent practice brings results. Ask most successful entrepreneurs how many times they failed and the number is far greater than those who haven’t tried.

In the gig economy your “job” will change more frequently so if you’re not learning new skills or polishing your current ones, you’ll be left behind.

My point is don’t rely on one source of income to sustain you. In a fast-paced, changing world it’s better to have options in case something doesn’t pan out the way you anticipated it to. Life comes at you fast. Be ready.

Diversify your career. You have a better chance of succeeding that way.

Why You Should Systemize Your Next Idea

Having a side hustle isn’t a luxury anymore, it’s a necessity.

Today’s middle class is barely making it. Therefore thinking about your next business idea should be reality (like yesterday).

The main reason 80% of businesses fail within 5 years is because of its faulty foundation: you.

That’s not a knock of your skills or ideas, but your focus. After finishing reading The E Myth Revisited, Gerber emphasizes working on your business, not in it. Simply put, any business dependent on you to run it is destined to fail.

The only way to monetize your next idea is to systemize it. This is something I’m working on. I like being involved. I prefer to individualize customer interactions. I want to cater to people’s needs.

The problem there is the lack of a consistent experience. As much as we may loathe sales pitches, they are measurable. Standardizing a product or service provides branded expectations. When you think about it the best companies present clearly.

When an explanation is simple and easy to understand, a customer can decide whether to buy or not.

When an explanation is unclear, a customer leaves confused which results in a no.

The best example for systemizing your next idea are franchises. Starting at the model concept, processes and details are hammered out to a tee so it can be replicable at another location. Customers who visit any spot should experience a very similar encounter.

Another key factor in systemization is hiring others to help. This means people or outside systems (automation). Essentially this means delegating all the pieces you aren’t great at in order to grow the business.

It starts with the right mentality. Focus on developing the business to run itself. You won’t be able to afford all the help you need right away, but you should never defer from that plan. Most small business owners take shortcuts early on by doing everything which produces short-term gains, but in the long-run it’s not sustainable.

Ironically I’ve experienced this at a program level before where I put the right people in place and let it run like a well-oiled machine. It felt like everything was on “auto-pilot.” My goal is to implement this strategy with my next idea and where I’m finding it most helpful so far is in the early stages of discerning which ideas to pursue.

Some people’s goal is never to scale or sell a business and that’s ok. But what I’m learning is when you systemize your idea correctly, at least you’ll have that option because others see value in a predictable money making machine.

Why Going Viral Shouldn’t Be Your Goal

going-viral

15 minutes of fame.

Instant gratification at it’s best…but does it mean anything?

Going viral does wonders for your ego, yet puts nothing in your pocket.

If longevity is what you’re after “hits” should be an afterthought.

Nothing wrong with it, but not an accomplishment in itself.

Investors, like on Shark Tank, don’t care about your free PR. They want to see sales. Marketing is crucial, but only effective when it converts. Social media “likes” aren’t the same as purchases.

In the gig economy side hustle is a way of life. If you don’t have one now, you should in the near future. It doesn’t need to put food on the table, but supplemental income is more than just gravy. Plus you’ll never know without trying.

Take for instance a rainbow. Although visually beautiful (marketing), the pot of gold is what you should be after (sales). Nothing screams validation more than results.

More exposure is always a good thing, but don’t stop there. Remember William Hung from American Idol? He got his 15 minutes of fame, but where is he now?

You shouldn’t settle for being a one-hit wonder/flash in the pan, rather build something of substance that stands the test of time. Going viral may be part of the journey, but it should never be the destination.

Click that.

Winsight Episode 5: Why You Need a PHD (Permanent Hustle Degree)

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School is overrated. Now with a Bachelors and Masters Degree under my belt that sounds hypocritical coming from me, but knowledge doesn’t necessarily translate to real world skills.

You can’t afford to wait for the economy to rebound. It’s not going to happen.

In this episode, I’ll explain the following reasons why you need a PHD (permanent hustle degree):

  • Why there is NO substitution for experience
  • Networking shouldn’t just be a goal, it should be part of your lifestyle
  • How public speaking is just like selling
  • Why you need a side hustle and when you should start one (or many)

What’s your experience with school and how has it shaped you into the person you are today? What idea has been brewing in your head/heart that you need to share with the world? Comment below because we need to know!

permanent hustle degree, degree, entrepreneurship, education, college is a scam, hustle young man hustle

The Pie Strategy

When I look at a pie, I imagine cutting it into pieces and devouring it slice by slice…

A whole pie is actually a great illustration for looking at your business. Let me explain.

cherry pie, apple pie, dessert, pie ala mode, piece of the pie

Ever since I started my coaching business, I thought coaching was what I was offering. It was, and still is, but it’s just a piece of the pie – not the entire pie itself.

If I rely on coaching as my only source of income, I’m dead. Even the busiest coaches don’t dream of coaching people all day. They may make a lot of money, but it’s tiring and dependent on your time as the coach being involved.

The “pie strategy” has changed the way I think of my business

Instead of putting “all my eggs in one basket,” I’ve decided that coaching is one of many things I offer.

I also do training, recruiting, events and I’m working on online marketing and online courses.

By following different lifestyle entrepreneurs, the key insight that hit me was: time ≠ money.

That means you shouldn’t be dependent on making money solely when you’re involved with it.

I offer a service (coaching), but people don’t really want to work with me. What they really want is the knowledge I can impart so they can apply it to their own lives/business.

That being said, online courses make a lot of sense. People can purchase them when they want. It’s cheaper than coaching. I can create them on my own time and I don’t have to be a part of it once it’s live. An in-person event may be overall more engaging, but with the convenience of watching it in your own home, it’s a value that’s hard to beat.

So think about ways to “take yourself out of your business.” Almost like putting it on auto-pilot.

Each new stream of income is like another piece to the pie. Mmm…that tastes good.

Switching to Auto-Pilot

Have you ever driven somewhere so many times that after you’ve reached your destination you completely forgot how you got there?

Believe it or not that happens at work too, BUT it can be a good thing.

airplane the movie, auto pilot, cruise control, auto park, distraction free driving, leslie neilsen, kareem abdul jabbar

Similar to athletes “getting in the zone,” when distraction-free, your mind produces at a phenomenal rate. There are different ways to arrive there, but let me share what’s worked for me the past several years:

Schedule everything into your smartphone with reminder alerts (and I mean EVERYTHING).

There’s a reason why iCalendar has three categories: home, social/out & home. You’re supposed to use them all.

Start with reserving “pockets” of work you need to get done (it doesn’t matter if you work at an office or at home). During that period don’t answer the phone, check emails, play games, etc. (unless that’s you’re actual task)

Next, put down the outings you’re planning on taking: chores, shopping, pick-ups, etc. (basically anything where you have to travel to).

Lastly, what needs or can be done at home? It can range anywhere from washing dishes to calling a friend on the phone.

I know it might sound a bit ridiculous, but here’s the payoff…

If you pre-schedule everything you have to do, you don’t have to remember anything. Even when you get sidetracked, your alerts remind you what to do. I’m obsessed with efficiency so that’s probably why this method works for me, but it really comes in handy when I need to pay a bill online because that’s something I would normally forget to do.

I probably take it too far since I even schedule where we are going to eat and do on vacations, but it actually saves time because decisions are made in advance. Of course there are times when things happen out of your control and you have to adjust, but at least you can re-schedule what you originally planned to do and continue to function on auto-pilot.

Even if you’re a free spirit, creative who hates structure this can work for you (type A’s love it). Running on auto-pilot saves time so you can spend your actual free time on what you please.

Looking for more time-hacking strategies? Check out this month’s free webinars!