Stop Waiting Until You’re Ready

If you’re waiting until you’re ready to start a project, stop.

Technically you’re never “ready.”

There’s always more research to do…

There’s always more testing to do…

There’s always more planning to do…

Problem is, that’s what’s stopping you…the failure to act.

Take advice from someone whose started a number of projects that haven’t turned out successful: you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.

Just like hurt is inevitable in relationships, failure is bound to happen at some point in business/your career. Deal with it.

What’s helpful to know is by NOT doing anything you’re making a choice:

Every action or inaction you take has a cost. Most of the time the cost of doing NOTHING is more painful.

Use the analogy of going to the gym. The hardest part is getting there, but once you arrive rarely do you regret it. The feeling of accomplishment after completing a workout should overpower not feeling like going.

Today monetizing a passion doesn’t mean quitting your job to start a business. It includes creating a side hustle. If you think of your career as a financial investment, doesn’t it make more sense to diversify than go all-in on one role?

Freelancing will soon pass up full-time employment in the job market. That means multiple streams of income is the future of survival. If you currently don’t love selling, get used to it.

You and I value mentors because of their experience. Without starting something you lack it. Trial and error is still the best teacher, so in order to grow stop thinking and start doing.

That’s how every successful company got to where they are now: they started.

Dreaming is overrated.

Execution is what counts.

How to S.C.A.L.E. your Business

Coming up with a business idea is easy, executing it is hard.

There’s a big difference between “doing what you love” and creating a business that makes money.

Sure, you should choose something you have a vested interest in, but you need a sales/marketing strategy to go along with it before you launch.

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For example, I love coaching, but that alone is NOT going to pay the bills. I evaluate different opportunities now based on the income potential. Is my motivation to be filthy rich? No. But I want to provide for my family and have my business ventures support my lifestyle. So here is an acronym to help you judge your next idea against:

Sell your strengths – Do what you know and are great at. Don’t try to do everything well. That only disrupts your focus and dilutes your efforts. Figure out what you’re best at and stick there.

Collaborate – Nothing great is accomplished alone. The bigger the dream, the more help you’ll need. Network like your life depends on it. Offer value to others, but don’t keep “score.” Say yes to most partnerships at first. Learn from others who have done it before.

Automate – Figure out how to get yourself out of your business. That means aim to put it on auto-pilot and let it run itself. Most people’e egos won’t let them NOT micromanage, but if you truly want something to grow, you have to give up full control. It doesn’t mean you won’t be involved, but it does mean you won’t be involved in every little detail anymore. Trust good people and systems to do what you can’t.

Lifestyle – Your business doesn’t need to be your life, unless you want it to be. Have your business support your lifestyle, not the other way around. If you plan that way, you’ll have a life and the time to spend it the way you want. That’s the best part about being a lifestyle entrepreneur: the freedom and flexibility of schedule.

Efficiency – Time is the currency that is given equally to all. Use it wisely. Along with selling your strengths, collaborating and automating you want to spend your time and effort on what gives you the best ROI. Being busy for busy’s sake is just plain dumb. A rocking chair makes a lot of movement, but doesn’t go anywhere. As someone who is obsessed with efficiency, work smarter, not harder.

If you measure your business effort against S.C.A.L.E., you should be able to select a project that is both worthwhile and profitable. I hope this is helpful and I’d love to hear what you’re working on. Please comment below!