Winsight Episode 26: Leading the Current Generation

millennials, gen y, talent development and retention, entitled, startup generation, emotionally reactive

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/winsight/26_Winsight_Episode_26_-_Leading_the_Current_Generation.mp3]

 

Millennials. A single word can conjure up varying descriptions and emotions. Some of the stereotypes about this generation are true, yet others are not. Instead of sitting here and complaining about the shortcomings of this group, I prefer to point out how to lead them effectively.

In this episode the following points will be discussed:

  • Why teaching isn’t about being the “best in your field
  • How body language is a warning sign for motivation
  • The two types of vision that need to align
  • What Baby Boomers and Millennials have in common

Does this change your thoughts on Millennials? What adjustments will you make dealing with Millennials going forward?

Winsight Episode 7: Developing Leaders

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/winsight/07_Winsight_Episode_7_-_Developing_Leaders.mp3]

 

Leadership is a buzz word and everyone wants to be a leader. The truth is a small percentage of people are actually leaders. Now you can learn leadership skills, but that doesn’t make you a leader. You can hold positions, but that doesn’t make you a leader. Personally I fall much more on the side that a leader is born not made, but today’s episode isn’t going to tackle that dispute. Today, I’d like to share my personal thoughts on the difference between leadership and leadership development.

Through personal examples and stories I’ll share:

  • The second tier of leadership
  • The inverted triangle and how it changed my leadership style
  • How deferring on a hiking trip won a popularity contest
  • How leadership math works

As a leader what type of legacy do you want to leave? How does your style affect others? Share your positive and negative examples below so others can learn from your example!

developing leaders, leadership development, coaching, winsight podcast, coaching leaders, lead by example, managing vs. leading

 

Why You Shouldn’t be a Leader

Nowadays “leader” is a term thrown around too loosely. I come from the school of thought that leaders are born, not made. That doesn’t mean a leader can’t be developed. I just don’t think anyone can be a leader just by acquiring the skills. Whether you agree or disagree, hear out my reasoning behind this theory:

leadership is hard walk the plank pirate

Potential – Leaders are born into this world with intangible qualities that attract others to follow them. I’ve seen it on the playground as early as 2 years old. It’s not something they’re trying to do. It just comes out. When you were young, were others attracted to follow you?

Responsibility – Everyone loves to get praise when things go right, but can you handle the blame when things go wrong and it may not even be your fault? Leaders take ownership for poor results by themselves or others under their supervision. Being a leader isn’t as glamorous as advertised. It’s about deflecting the praise towards others and shouldering the burden when people are complaining. Are you willing to take the fall, under your watch, even if you’re right?

Profile – Leaders usually aren’t the outspoken, extroverts that the media portrays them to be. They’re usually the quiet, soft spoken ones who do things “under the radar.” Leaders don’t purposely seek attention. If it comes their way, fine, but it’s not something they desire. Leaders earn the respect of others by their example of consistent behavior(s). Do you “fit” the profile of a leader?

Results – One of the most important traits of a leader is the “fruit” of their labor. By definition, leadership is getting things done through people. One part task. One part relationship. Leadership is about what you’ve accomplished with and through the efforts from others. It’s like a personal resume of achievements over time. Do you have the “resume” of a leader? 

Confidence – Leaders don’t need the title of leader, they’re voluntarily given it by others. If you’re driven to lead by your ego, you’re going about it wrong. Leaders are confident, but not arrogant. Confidence is usually based on past successes, but a leader has an inner confidence that isn’t shaken easily by circumstances. Everyone loves “strokes,” but leaders don’t need them. Is your confidence level unflappable, even during scrutiny? 

If you answered “no” to any of these questions, consider this a realization. Everyone isn’t cracked up to be a leader. In fact it’s better that way. If there are too many leaders on a team, nothing gets done. Leaders are invaluable, but that doesn’t mean you need to be one. In my opinion, the best leaders aren’t the most dynamic, but they are great at developing the people around them. So by this definition, are you a leader?