Building A Career in Social Media

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One of the most underrated yet accessible careers today is that of a social media brand ambassador. It seems like a daunting endeavor, but becoming an ambassador is easier than it looks and it’s the perfect career for generations such as Millennials and members of Generation Z. These two generations are incredible tech-savvy and make great social media representatives.

What is a Brand Ambassador?

A brand ambassador’s main responsibility is to raise awareness of a company and their available products. By utilizing social media, they function as spokespeople and attempt to sell a company’s product’s to their fanbase. Anyone can become a brand ambassador with the right direction and strategic social media campaigning.

How To Get Started

The hardest part about becoming an online brand ambassador is getting started, so here’s the best place for you to begin.

Step 1: Find a brand you connect with.

When choosing what brand you’d like to represent, you should choose to apply for brands that fit your own personal style. In order to really encourage audience engagement, your looks and lifestyle should enhance the products you’re trying to sell. If you’re sporty and want to produce more athletic content, then a sportswear company like Fabletics will be more enjoyable for both you and your following. However, if you’re more of a cocktail and wine night host, a store like Oh Polly is a better fit for your personal brand.

Step 2: Building Your Audience

A major part of your success is going to come from your audience’s engagement with your social media pages. Start with people you know. The best networks start with those you’re familiar with. Reach out to friends and family members, and get the word out that you’ve taken on a brand ambassador position. This way you’ll be able to reach new people through sources who can advocate for not only the company you’re representing but for you as the ambassador. You should also make sure to tag the social media pages of the company you’re representing. Their company is likely to repost pictures from  your page and that allows more people to discover your accounts.

Step 3: Get Your Audience To Engage With Your Page

Now that you’ve built an audience, keep them on the book by encouraging them to engage with your social media platforms. Try different trends like making ”A Week In My Life” videos or doing a Q&A session about yourself and the company you;re representing. This way, your audience can get to know both you and the company better and on more personal terms. Be sure to make sure these videos and streams are of a high quality. Content is more engaging if you have the right kit. If you’re showing off your kitchen, something as silly as a misplaced water stop can make your video seem less entertaining or can draw focus away from the main focus of your video.

In a digital age, there has been a rise of everyday people becoming successful social media influencers and brand ambassadors. For members of the Millenial and Generation Z crowds, their natural knack for social media campaigning and networking makes them strong candidates for this career path. Although a lot of this position involves being at the right place at the right time, the beauty is you can reach out to as many brands as you wish in a short amount of time and continue to work in this field for as long as you desire.

Social Media: All About Generational Preference

science-and-social-media-platforms

Today technology represents communication. Simply put, social media platforms come down to style and preference. Of course there are exceptions to the rule, but to quote George Clooney in the movie Up In The Air, for brevity purposes we’ll stereotype here, it’s faster.

Facebook: All (news source), Baby Boomers are fastest growing population

Pinterest: Moms (who are into fashion/crafts)

LinkedIn/Twitter/YouTube/Yelp: Millennials/Gen X

Instagram/Snapchat/Periscope/Vine: Millennials/Gen Z (all about selfies)

Google+/Tumblr: N/A

For marketing purposes, it doesn’t matter which platform you like best, it’s choosing the one(s) your customers use most frequently.

For example, I use Twitter the most because it’s “real time” breaking news. As a die-hard Lakers fan, I communicate with my peers daily on rumors, discussions and recent stories. I use it as a conversational piece and it’s done well to spread my sports blog posts to a larger audience of people I would have never of met otherwise. On the other hand, I enjoy looking at Instagram, Snapchat and Periscope because they are visual and engaging. I don’t post as much as the people I follow, but it keeps me up to date on what’s current. Professionally LinkedIn is my favorite. It’s one of the most focused social networks where there’s a reason to connect with people while acting as a “live resume” especially to recruiters.

What’s cool and popular isn’t as important as which one(s) you need to spend time on. I’ve cut down my Facebook visits because I found myself wasting a lot of time on there looking at useless updates. So even though Facebook continues to dominate the social media space, I’ve decreased my participation based on needs. Most of my customers find me on LinkedIn and Yelp, so I make sure to stay active on those. And since I engage with Millennials more than any other generation Instagram, Snapchat and Periscope reveal what’s trendy.

The best advice I’ve heard is stop trying to be active on all platforms. There’s no crime having an account on each stage, but focus on one at a time and learn how to master it. Social media is about communicating. The question is: who are you talking to and why?  

Scott Asai is a speaker/coach that has been developing leaders for 20+ years – athletes, companies and individuals. His focus is helping people develop leadership skills to advance in their careers. Scott tends to attract a large audience of Millennials and Introverts to his programs/events. His professional background consists of: B.A. in Psychology, M.A. in Organizational Leadership, Certified Professional Coach and Certified Strengths Coach.