Can You Turn Your Smallholding Into A Money Making Startup?

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Many of us love the idea of getting back to nature, being a little more self-sufficient and learning the skills to help us grow our own vegetables. A select few will take their organic dreams to the next level and will seek to make money from their newfound nature adventure. Turning your passion for growing vegetables into a business is easier said than done. A smallholding is just that; it’s small and is designed to provide vegetables for you and your family. Scaling up is a tougher endeavor. Read on to discover how you could take your foray into self-sufficiency and turn it into a new and thriving startup.

What Makes Money?

Potatoes and carrots may be easy to grow, but they won’t be a very profitable unit to sell. Instead, consider the most cost effective things to grow or produce which you can then sell on for a hefty profit. Consider purchasing a flock of egg laying hens and selling their highly coveted deposits a half dozen at a time. If you are interested in poultry, look into the more unique breeds that produce more interesting flavors of eggs. The Golden Comet hen is a great all rounder that produces fine yields for sale. Forget the tomatoes and cucumbers, and utilize your greenhouse for more exotic courgette flowers, eggplants and chili peppers. The more unique produce will command a higher price at a farmers market.

Think Big

Scaling up your operation can seem like a challenge. However, by pacing yourself and walking before you run, you can manage a sensible and profitable increase in your produce, demand and custom. If you have the space, think about zoning out some of your acreage. By creating distinct zones, you could grow crops, produce eggs, have some milking cows, rear pigs and look into the growing market of edible flowers or herbs. You don’t have to do all of these things, but having the option means you always have space to diversify and expand. Look into the sorts of domestic and industrial farm sheds that you could build on your smallholding to house your equipment, tools and seeds. Scaling up means that you will have to create a secure and protected space to shield your stock from the elements.

Advertise

There is no point developing a farm or smallholding that generates such wonderful produce if there is no one willing to buy from you. You must get your business out there to begin generating the custom you need to make a success of your venture. Check out local farmers markets and get yourself a pitch. Get your new venture onto Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and show off your produce and wares. By displaying your eggs, marjoram and celeriac, you can join a network of local growers. There is strength in numbers when it comes to small businesses and you will find a supportive web of contacts to help you on your journey.

If you adore your smallholding and want to take it to the next level, start small and scale up gradually. Before long, you could have a solid customer base eagerly awaiting your next batch of organic eggs!

The 1 Word That Changes Entrepreneurship

The difference between failure and success as a business owner can be minuscule.

Being an entrepreneur for 10 years I’ve had to learn a lot of hard lessons, but one concept has been clear-cut lately.

Systems beat sweat.

That doesn’t contradict hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard, instead it signals that “smarter” refers to systems when it comes to efficiency.

The simple shift from “my” business to “the” business can be the difference between being profitable and a hobby.

A lot of entrepreneurs describe their business as their baby (as did I) which can be a huge mistake.

If you watch a lot of business shows on TV like The Profit, Shark Tank & Restaurant Startup the common theme you’ll see is a clear system in place. The term scale is thrown out like common lingo meaning to strategically plan for exponential growth.

For myself I didn’t embrace this theory early on because my reasons for owning a business had more to do with flexibility than money. If you fall more into the lifestyle entrepreneur category like me, scaling is still very important.

Most people who leave Corporate America do it because they want to be their own boss. What you don’t realize is you’re leaving a systemized company that has already figured out how to scale. Besides now figuring out how to make money, the challenge of creating a repeatable, predictable system falls on you.

Once you start looking at your idea (pre-business) as a business, not your business, it becomes less personal and more objective. Ever wonder why it’s easier to give advice to other business owners than to your own? It’s because it’s not yours!

This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be invested and passionate about your business, but less attached and more determined to make it run without you.

Successful business owners almost seem a bit detached from their business and that’s actually healthy. They are more focused on strategy and automation than having their hands all over it. In fact, similar to most authors, once you start a business there’s a good chance it won’t be your last (regardless of the success of failure of one).

Serial entrepreneurship is a lifestyle. It’s being obsessed with ideas and figuring out how to monetize them. I can’t say I’ve figured it out, but it’s a ride I hope I never get tired of going on.

One word makes all the difference.