How to Pursue a Good Idea When You Don’t Know Where to Start

Collaborative post – may contain affiliate links

Good ideas come in all shapes and sizes, and sometimes, the person with the good idea isn’t necessarily going to be able to achieve it on their own. For example, if you have a great idea for a line of cleaning products, you might have the marketing and advertising down and the funding covered but you aren’t entirely sure how to actually manufacture the product.

Or indeed, it might be that you can make the product, but every other step in the narrative to success is eluding you.

Don’t panic. This is normal. And, it’s why great inventors tend not to work on their own in a garage at the bottom of the garden, but in collaborative teams where other people and experts can help to refine their ideas.

If you’ve had a good idea but you don’t know where to start, this is what you should do.

Tell People About Your Idea

Of course, knowing that an idea can be done and finding a market for that same idea are two very different things. Talking to your friends is a good plan because they will be able to suggest ways that it might be made better or indeed point you towards similar products on the market.

It can be difficult to tell people about an idea you are holding close for fear of ridicule, but this really is the best way to get it out in the open and start to refine it into something that will sell. You might also be worried about your friend stealing your idea. This is natural and it is probably a wise choice to apply for a patent to protect your idea, and not just from your friends. This process will also show up any similar ideas that have already been patented.

Ask an Expert for Help

Good ideas are rarely the work of just one person so taking your seed and getting an expert’s advice will help the idea to take root. Continuing with the cleaning product analogy, you might want to seek the professional help of a company who can provide custom chemical formulation to find out how you can make the best product with what you have.

Make a Prototype

Once you have consulted friends and experts, it is time to make a prototype. This will show whether your idea actually works, for starters, but it will also flag areas that could be improved as will as parts that could be simplified in order to make the manufacturing process easier. Bear in mind that your first prototype will not be perfect and this is not a reason to give up, just a reason to continue refining and improving as you go along.

Don’t Wait Until You’re Ready

There is a whole blog on the subject but the headline is exactly as it states. If you wait until the perfect time, you will miss the boat. This is because there is no perfect time.

Trust your instinct, run with your idea and get it out into the world.

The Curse Of The Entrepreneur

People who dream about one day owning a business tend to latch on to the potential, nothing else.

There’s nothing wrong with chasing your dreams, but it’s a lot more glamorous than it looks.

Imagine if I told you entrepreneurship includes working longer hours and getting paid less. Sure you can control when you don’t work, but you can’t control when you get paid. Freedom has it’s price tag and for some until you experience it, it’s too much.

But for those who have dipped a toe into the entrepreneur’s pool, there’s one area that’s extremely hard to go back to: having a boss.

I can’t tell you how exhilarating having complete flexibility is. Recently someone told me working a 9 – 6 with benefits isn’t desirable anymore. To each their own, but the tradeoff between time and money is a crucial decision everyone is faced with.

Coming off a 9-month stint at a company makes me appreciate my workdays much more now. It didn’t help I had a micromanager of a boss on top, but I learned a lot about myself during the process.

Things like my optimal working hours are 9 AM – 3 PM, when deciding whether or not to pursue a business idea identifying the market matters most and running a company solo is plain stupid.

Being an entrepreneur is a blessing and a curse. It affords you more control and flexibility, yet loss of structure and a steady paycheck. All the books and articles published that highlight successful ventures represent less than 1% of reality.

There’s no formula to the madness, but valuing your lifestyle over income will push you over the edge.

The funny thing about entrepreneurship is the “what” will change frequently, but as long as your “why” and “how” stay the same you’re fine. If you’re bored at your current job you can do two things: stick it out or look elsewhere. Most choose the former because it’s comfortable, but you’ll know it’s time to move on when it lowers the quality of your life.

Call me crazy, but part of the intrigue of entrepreneurship is the chase. It’s going after something you’re not sure you’ll catch, but willing to take the risk because failure is more acceptable than regret.