The Devil Is In The Detail, But Do You Have What It Takes To Build A Career In Engineering?

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You could argue that every career requires precision handling from impassioned employees. After all, it’s this level of focus that creates real results. For individuals considering a career in any aspect of engineering, however, the word precision takes on an entirely new meaning. 

In fact, with even one lapse in concentration potentially proving fatal, you could say that concentration here is an absolute must. yet, for millennials who have grown up operating on instant gratification, and with attention spans so-called shorter than that of a goldfish, it’s easy to assume that this field isn’t viable. .

However, with skills shortages already ravaging our engineering industry, it’s plain to see that things need to change. After all, far from simply fulfilling practical needs (which they also do), engineers are at the cutting edge of innovation. And, in a world where things are always changing, we need engineering expertise that keeps on bringing us back up to speed.

So, what does that mean for millennials who have thus far considered engineering precision out of reach? In large part, it highlights the need to begin tailoring an entirely different skillset to the fast-fire, office-based focuses that so many of us have been geared up for. Here, we’re going to consider just a few of the ways that millennial job seekers can start tailoring their skill sets for that purpose. 

# 1 – Put in the study

Many modern employers now simply seek graduate-level candidates, without really requiring specializations as such. However, just as you wouldn’t enter a career in medicine without putting in the specialist work, it’s imperative that individuals put in the study necessary to truly succeed in this field. The good news is that there are different ways to do this, the most obvious of which is a specified engineering degree, for which individuals must hold A levels in maths and some field of physical science. For individuals without A levels, apprenticeships that provide on-the-job training are a fantastic alternative route, and are especially invaluable at a time where employers in this field are keener than ever to ramp up production using fresh, applicable skills.

# 2 – Tailor your concentration

Everything that you do in any field of engineering requires dedicated concentration that enables you to ensure the safest, best-built results possible. Whether you want to be a civil engineer focusing on bridge beams and girders or a marine engineer positioning silicon bronze carriage bolts, there is no room for error. Yet, with millennials often taught to expect instant gratification, these levels of concentration are no longer a given. Instead, individuals must harness this skill, both through obvious outlets like brain-training games, and also less-obvious benefits to concentration including exercise and improved sleep. During their studies, too, budding engineers should harness higher levels of concentration to ensure that they’re always operating with the precision necessary to ensure great results.

# 3 – Understand workplace communication

While communication is necessary for every workplace, engineering that requires teams to work together seamlessly to create safer finished products takes this necessity to the next level. For individuals just entering the career world, this can be a problem, and it’s realistically one that even studying and increased focus isn’t going to help with. In fact, the only real way to perfect on-job communication is to experience it first-hand. Of course, individuals working engineering apprenticeships enjoy this benefit first-hand by getting stuck straight into the practicalities of engineering work. For individuals taking a classroom-based route, however, accepting part-time jobs alongside studying can be an ideal first step towards the seamless inter-colleague communication on which this career is ultimately going to rest. 

# 4 – Embrace creativity

It’s also essential to note that, for all of the practical learning inherent in great engineering, innovation and creativity are really what set experts apart from average achievers. As such, aside from the practicalities of your learning, you must start to tap into a more intuitive engineering outlook. Drawing or other creative hobbies can be a great way to achieve this, especially if you center them around your specific field of engineering. After all, once you’ve perfected the design of your own bridges, boats, or whatever else, you’ll be far better able to offer intuitive, valuable, and importantly viable, ideas either during the interview stage or within a role that you’ve already secured.

Engineering an engineering career isn’t easy, but these tips will surely be worth it if you think you’re the right person to fill this ever-widening skills shortage.

Want to Become an Electrical Engineer? Here’s What it Takes

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Are you looking for a career change? Do you have an interest in electronics and other technologies? Then a career as an Electrical Engineer might be the way forward for you. One of the highest paid jobs (salaries average around $101,600 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics) and always in demand, it’s easy to see why so many people enter the industry each year. 

But before we get into how you become an Electrical Engineer, let’s look at what they do in their role.

What is an Electrical Engineer?

Skilled and experienced professionals, they work within fields that are related to electronics, electromagnetism and electricity. Such industries include the aerospace industry, Power Generation, defense and Artificial Intelligence. Because of the scope for this role, the opportunities and possibilities are endless. 

Skills That Are Needed

As there are so many fields that an Electrical Engineer can enter, it’s important to recognize that character attributes are hard to define. But when it comes to skills, there is a certain set that they will require in order to perform their role. These skills include, but are not limited to the following:

  • An in-depth knowledge of electronics – including how to operate a variety of machinery and equipment (such as different types of Solenoid valves in hydraulics).
  • An understanding of engineering, science and technology.
  • A logistical way of thinking.
  • The ability to predict physical laws and principles.

How to Enter the Industry

Obtain a high school diploma – so that you can access a university or college course related to electrical engineering.

Enroll in an electrical engineering program at a respected college or university – to do this, spend some time comparing and contrasting different options, paying attention to their employment rates and what past students have said about the course. If you really want to impress, you could also look for one that’s course has been recognized by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Choose a subfield – during your degree, you can choose modules that are in particular engineering subfields. These specialities will demonstrate your interests and experience to employers. If you’re unsure as to which to choose, it’s a good idea to talk to your professors, who will help to guide you.

Try to find work experience within electrical engineering – this helps to demonstrate to future employers that along obtaining a degree, you worked to gain useful experience to help develop your skills.

Extend your skills by opting for a masters or doctorate – although this isn’t always essential, for those that want to progress quickly in their career, these degrees can be an effective way of doing this. 

Find a job within the industry – once you’ve completed your degree/s, spend some time hunting for a job within the industry. As the demand for Electrical Engineers is high, you shouldn’t have an issue. 

However, as it’s a popular career, it can sometimes be difficult to obtain one – which is why it’s so important to differentiate yourself from other candidates through crafting your CV and acquiring the right work experience.

Final Thoughts

So, there you go! There is a brief guide as to what it takes to become an Electrical Engineer. Of course, before you take the leap and settle on this career, it’s important that you comprehensively research the key steps and look into what the job market is like. This will help to prepare you and give you an invaluable insight into the role.