Want to Become an Electrical Engineer? Here’s What it Takes

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Are you looking for a career change? Do you have an interest in electronics and other technologies? Then a career as an Electrical Engineer might be the way forward for you. One of the highest paid jobs (salaries average around $101,600 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics) and always in demand, it’s easy to see why so many people enter the industry each year. 

But before we get into how you become an Electrical Engineer, let’s look at what they do in their role.

What is an Electrical Engineer?

Skilled and experienced professionals, they work within fields that are related to electronics, electromagnetism and electricity. Such industries include the aerospace industry, Power Generation, defense and Artificial Intelligence. Because of the scope for this role, the opportunities and possibilities are endless. 

Skills That Are Needed

As there are so many fields that an Electrical Engineer can enter, it’s important to recognize that character attributes are hard to define. But when it comes to skills, there is a certain set that they will require in order to perform their role. These skills include, but are not limited to the following:

  • An in-depth knowledge of electronics – including how to operate a variety of machinery and equipment (such as different types of Solenoid valves in hydraulics).
  • An understanding of engineering, science and technology.
  • A logistical way of thinking.
  • The ability to predict physical laws and principles.

How to Enter the Industry

Obtain a high school diploma – so that you can access a university or college course related to electrical engineering.

Enroll in an electrical engineering program at a respected college or university – to do this, spend some time comparing and contrasting different options, paying attention to their employment rates and what past students have said about the course. If you really want to impress, you could also look for one that’s course has been recognized by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Choose a subfield – during your degree, you can choose modules that are in particular engineering subfields. These specialities will demonstrate your interests and experience to employers. If you’re unsure as to which to choose, it’s a good idea to talk to your professors, who will help to guide you.

Try to find work experience within electrical engineering – this helps to demonstrate to future employers that along obtaining a degree, you worked to gain useful experience to help develop your skills.

Extend your skills by opting for a masters or doctorate – although this isn’t always essential, for those that want to progress quickly in their career, these degrees can be an effective way of doing this. 

Find a job within the industry – once you’ve completed your degree/s, spend some time hunting for a job within the industry. As the demand for Electrical Engineers is high, you shouldn’t have an issue. 

However, as it’s a popular career, it can sometimes be difficult to obtain one – which is why it’s so important to differentiate yourself from other candidates through crafting your CV and acquiring the right work experience.

Final Thoughts

So, there you go! There is a brief guide as to what it takes to become an Electrical Engineer. Of course, before you take the leap and settle on this career, it’s important that you comprehensively research the key steps and look into what the job market is like. This will help to prepare you and give you an invaluable insight into the role.

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