Top Tips On Changing Career in Your Later Years

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No matter where you are in the world, there is a rather high chance that you do not find work the most riveting activity. You might even be unhappy about it, which is nothing out of the ordinary nowadays. Employees who are unhappy with their position or job outnumber the happy employees by two to one according to a recent study. That in itself is a staggering amount of miserable, especially in a scenario which is so ubiquitous to everyday life. If you do not start making a change now, then no one will do it for you. Life is full of opportunities, and changing workplace, moving onto greener pastures, is nowhere near as impossible as some make it out to be.

With that out of the way, let’s look at some ways in which you could work on switching careers, past your initial school phase of life.

Start a business

If you’ve had enough of working the 9-5 then perhaps starting a business is right for you. There are many opportunities to enter the world of business, including retail ideas, professional services, and franchises that offer everything from mosquito control business opportunities to opening your own fast-food joint. This career change can be inspiring; however, it doesn’t come without challenges, and you’ll have to consider finances, planning, and marketing before leaping in.

Go back to college

Since the issue is becoming more and more known around the world, universities aimed more at adults have been popping up all over the place as of late. They often boast of somewhat flexible attending times and are set up in a way in which you can easily attend in whatever schedules work for you. Working full time and don’t have time to participate during the day? Come in after work during the evenings! Working part-time and want to attend during your days off? That could most probably also be arranged. Getting educated during adulthood has never been easier, and if you want to transform your life during your downtime, then there is no better time than now. The path towards a career you’ve always dreamed of could be a mere few phone calls away, and stalling is not going to help anyone at this point, so it’s better to get interested sooner rather than later.

Re-train with an apprenticeship

For some people, getting into an evening college course or something along those lines is not an option. Maybe due to the lack of money in the first place, being unable to pay school fees and whatnot, but perhaps just due to the fact that they have rent to pay next week, and cannot allow themselves for much downtime. Perhaps, despite the flexible hours, you just could not work out a schedule, which would work in the long run. This is the moment where you should consider getting a placement as an apprentice and getting interested in apprenticeships for employers.

Being an apprentice often carries some sort of stigma, being related to essentially making coffee or tea for the employees while you run around doing menial tasks for less than minimum wage. Now while this is not entirely wrong, and it certainly has happened to some people in the past, times are changing, and being an apprentice carries a bit more weight nowadays. If you’re lucky, you can find an apprenticeship with an actual full wage, even if minimum, but surely still enough to pay the rent. You may not be able to splash the cash like a madman for the time being, but this is virtually guaranteeing you a foot in the door to your desired field, which is worth considerably more in the long run.

Create the perfect CV and covering letter

If you don’t have a chance to impress in person, your CV should be your trump card. This seemingly innocuous piece of paper or Word document stands between you and the opportunity to get that dream job, so it has to do the business. Focus on using your CV to demonstrate and showcase your skills and think of it as a pitch. Imagine you’re on The Apprentice and think about how you’re going to use words to convince the person reading them that you are the best candidate. Keep things brief and concise, and highlight your strengths.

Consider how you can use your CV to make you stand out. Have you invested time in developing your skills thanks to courses from external providers? Do you speak different languages or have you worked abroad? Do you volunteer or have you traveled the world? Have you got additional qualifications that aren’t mentioned on the job description or have you completed placements or gained experience in environments, which could further your cause? Put yourself in an employer’s shoes and see if you’d be impressed by what’s in front of you.

Many organizations ask for a cover letter. Your letter should be punchy and to the point. Don’t ramble or repeat yourself. Explain who you are, why you’re applying, and what you feel you could bring to the role. Tailor the letter to the type of position and the company to which you’re applying. If the job is creative by nature, you can be a little more imaginative and original with your letter, but if not, it’s best to stick to a traditional, more formal template.

If you’ve been asked to respond to questions as part of the application process, plan your answer first. Look at the word count, break down the question into parts and answer each bit, backing up your statements with examples and case studies. You could link to a portfolio of your work, for example. Make sure your responses are clear, relevant, and well thought out. Don’t waffle to fill the space or go over the same subject time and time again. Create a logical answer that responds to every element of the question and showcases you in your best light. Before you hit the send button, always check your spelling and grammar.

These are just some of the things you can do to make a top career change in adulthood. You don’t have to be stuck in a dead end job for the rest of your life, and there’s a world of opportunities just waiting to be explored to help you build a successful and exciting career that you’ll love for years to come.

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